Do you miss depreciation?

I recently had a fascinating conversation with “D” @doobooloo about his new Furlan Marri watches, contrasting them (perhaps surprisingly) with his new R. W. Smith “micro architectural wonderland” which he recently took delivery of, after a 5 year wait! We then got onto the topic of how depreciation has changed the collecting mindset… and this post gives us a glimpse into collecting in what I call the “endgame league” – I’m sure D will disagree! I hope you enjoy the perspectives.

How do you define yourself?

If you speak to any branding consultant, designer or architect, they’ll tell you about how clients tend to have an easier time conveying what they don’t like about a design, sketch or draft… rather than what they would prefer instead. People manifest this dynamic in designing their lives too. This has consequences for watch collecting too.

The Paradox of Choice – quasi book summary and discussion

Barry Schwartz is an American psychologist, Professor of Social Theory and Social Action at Swarthmore College, and since 2016 has been visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley. His work focuses on the intersection of psychology and economics… He is also the author of the book “The Paradox of Choice” and he talks about the concepts from the book in this TED talk. In this post I wanted to outline some of the key points he makes, and connect them to a watch collector’s decision-making processes.

Try it – you might actually like it!

A few days ago I was reading this post about how our preconceived notions might hinder our decision-making… I thought it was so applicable watches, and wanted to share it here with a few comments.

Purchases under pressure

Yesterday, over lunch with the infamous @nycwatchguy and @f1ptb… … we discussed the concept of purchases under pressure. In the current environment this issue is far more pronounced, due to the rise of limited editions, the increased popularity of independent watchmaking (who have lower supply inherently) and because of general hype with any popular watches – often fuelled by the influx of profiteers into the watch game, who tend to pose as genuine enthusiasts or collectors. This also raised the question of what defines a “genuine” enthusiast anyway; and when is it ok to sell a watch without being labelled a flipper? Thoroughly enjoyed the conversation, and thought I would share a bit here.

What about vintage watches?

Earlier this week I posted about the evolution of watch collecting, and talked about what might happen next in the watch collecting hobby, as collecting evolves, and collectors experience decision fatigue. Quite a few people followed up with me asking about vintage watches, and even suggesting that vintage watches might be the next big thing – so I thought I’d share some thoughts on the topic and see what others think.