Consumerism and respect

All watches are not for everyone… that’s the beauty of our hobby. If you don’t like a watch, that’s your business. If you’d like to offer feedback to the watchmaker or company selling the watch, that’s obviously a good thing, and they ought to appreciate it. Just remember that you’re dealing with people sometimes, and these people have emotions just like you do. It would behoove you to check yourself before delivering your opinions and feedback. Except for Hublot – those are just shit 🙂

The hunt

Have you noticed how watch collectors seem to refer to their hobby as a disease? Why is that? Many collectors will attest to the fact that no matter how ‘grail worthy’ a new purchase may be, they always seem to tire of it eventually. Why is that?

Your gut feeling

As watch collectors, we find ourselves pondering over purchase options/decisions all the time. Perhaps we often know the answers to our questions, and our brain hides it from us?

Motivated reasoning

Previously, I have written about watch collectors’ addiction to both buying new watches, and social media… and how we could benefit from reducing our dopamine dependance. In this post, although related, I wanted to share some brief thoughts around motivated reasoning and how it impacts our thoughts and behaviour as collectors on Instagram.

Let’s talk about Envy

I recently had the pleasure of meeting up with a few friends I made through Instagram, and among the many topics we discussed, we explored the concept of envy in relation to watches and Instagram. It is a pretty gnarly topic which, understandably, doesn’t get discussed too often. I thought it would be interesting to explore. I’d like to thank @running_sands, @horology_ancienne and @watchguy315 for their opinions and thoughts on the matter.

The power of regret – book summary and discussion

It would seem that we tend to be coached both directly and indirectly that we would be wise to live a life with no regrets, and so, we tend to reframe everything with a silver lining, so we can avoid regret altogether. Daniel H. Pink, author of the new book, The Power of Regret: How Looking Backward Moves Us Forward, reckons this is “dead wrong”! (Not sure I fully agree, but anyway!)