Do you like the idea more than the reality?

As we collect, we find ourselves seeking advice and opinions from those around us. Inevitably, we might receive so much positive external input about a watch that the idea of owning it seems too good to ignore… and against our own better judgement, we fall into the trap of succumbing to this idea of owning that particular watch… only to find we don’t really enjoy owning it at all.

The future of buying and selling watches

Bring a Trailer has become one of the major destinations for car enthusiasts to find the next classic or cult machine to add to their garage. With this in mind, I wanted to talk about Doublewrist; a platform taking the same auction model and applying it to watches. The founder is a California-based lawyer who I met via Instagram, and we’ve grown to become friends over time. Since I think the concept is actually awesome, I thought it deserved some attention.

10 irrational human behaviours and how they apply to watch collecting

Dan Ariely is one of the most interesting people I have ever come across… I could go on about his various TED talks or the rest of his incredible CV – but you can enter that rabbit hole another time. Today, I wanted to cover Chris Yeh’s Outline of Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces that Shape Our Decisions. It’s one of Ariely’s most fascinating books… and takes a peek into the predictable psychology that powers human actions and reactions. As always, I’ll try and pick out some lessons we can apply to our world of watches. Here’s Ariely’s list…

Watch collectors: Don’t buy what you like!

Without the aforementioned deep-diving, the purchase of any watch is more transactional. This is why you should not simply “buy what you like”. This is common advice given to new collectors, and the problem with this advice, is the very nature of what you like, is likely a temporary conclusion.